107 places

people in 107 countries have come to this blog : albania / algeria / argentina / armenia / aruba / australia / austria / bahrain / bangladesh / barbados / belarus / belgium / belize / bosnia and herzegovina / brazil / brunei / bulgaria / cambodia / canada / chile / china / colombia / croatia / cyprus / czech republic / denmark / ecuador / egypt / el salvador / england / fiji / finland / france / georgia / germany / ghana / greece / guatemala / honduras / hong kong / hungary / iceland / india / indonesia / iran / iraq / ireland / isle of man / israel / italy / japan / jordan / kazakhstan / kenya / korea / kuwait / latvia / lebanon / liberia / lithuania / luxembourg / macao / macedonia / malaysia / mauritius / mexico / moldova / mongolia / morocco / myanmar / nepal / netherlands / new zealand / nicaragua / nigeria / norway / pakistan / panama / peru / philippines / poland / portugal / puerto rico / qatar / romania / russia / saudi arabia / senegal / serbia / singapore / slovakia / slovenia / south africa / spain / sri lanka / sweden / switzerland / taiwan / thailand / trinidad and tobago / tunisia / turkey / ukraine / united arab emirates / united states of america / venezuela / vietnam

26 March 2011

ba

In Chinese, sentences are necklaces, he says. You can always add another bead. English ones are more like tree trunks, with a central form.
I know two poets who write under a pen-name beginning with 'ba', a Chinese sentence structure that stresses the action done, the condition made. They read aloud side by side, switching sides, sometimes echoing each other, or interchanging words. Sometimes one poet stands behind the other. A title can be a long necklace, the poem forty minutes long.
Photo: Two trees, Lantau Island, Hong Kong
Text: After poetry readings by Roo Borson and Kim Maltman, who comprise Baziju,
and discussion of Chinese sentences by Luo Hui, the Director of the Confucius Institute
in Wellington, which presented the events

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